Trey Flowers – One of Eleven

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Sketch of Trey Flowers by Jack Kurzenknabe

One out of eleven.

Each individual on the football field is one out of eleven players representing his team.

New England Patriot’s defensive lineman, Trey Flowers, had a long time to get used to that ratio.  Growing up in Huntsville, Alabama, young Trey was one of eleven siblings.

In a family that large, you have to pitch in.  Trey’s father, Robert, owns Flowers Construction Company.  By the time he was 10-years old, Trey was already constructing walls, hanging shingles, and helping build houses.  Robert explained to Mark Daniels; “I’m a contractor. I worked hard. I wanted them to work, too.  Trey worked as hard as I did. When he was 12-years-old, he was worth $25 an hour to me. He could put on as much shingles or do as much construction work as any grown man.”

Trey learned as a young man the value of quiet, honest, hard work.  He has carried that blue-collar work ethic all the way to the NFL.  Flowers explains; “We grew up on a construction site.  It was just something about coming home, you’ve been gone from 6 in the morning to 8 at night coming home to a good meal, take a shower, go to sleep and do it all the next day. It was something that was instilled into us at a young age.”

Flowers worked hard; on the job site and on the football field.  His work was rewarded with a scholarship to the University of Arkansas.  The staff had discovered him through a YouTube highlight video and scouted him at a basketball game.  He was not, however, heavily recruited.  When he went to Arkansas, he found himself quickly buried on the bench.

That didn’t discourage Flowers.  Instead, he did what he did best; worked hard.  In time, his hard work payed off.  He became a starter and eventually got drafted by the New England Patriots in the 4th Round of the 2015 NFL Draft.

Reaching the NFL hasn’t changed Trey Flowers.  He’s still known for being quiet, humble, and working hard.  Defensive Coordinator, Brian Flores, gave him a nickname; “The Quiet Storm.”

Patriot’s defensive back Jason McCourty told the Boston Globe that the nickname “makes a lot of sense. I remember when I first got here, Trey always had his headphones on and I’m like… ‘he doesn’t talk at all.’ And then when you kind of get to know him a little more, you see he does talk, and laughs and jokes a lot.  He represents what we want to be as a defense, a guy that does more with his play than with his mouth and a tough guy that whatever is asked of him — setting the edge against the run game or getting pressure on the quarterback — he’s able to be versatile.”

Flowers adds; “I didn’t know about the nickname, but I do feel as though it’s one of those things that it does fit my personality.  I don’t say much, just put my head down. Anytime I am saying something, it’s obviously something that needs to be said. I guess people appreciate the words a little bit more than saying, ‘Nah, he’s just talking.’ I think it’s just describes who I am.”

One of the reasons Flowers doesn’t brag or boast about his success is because he knows he didn’t make it here alone.  He knows that his success comes from God.  He explained to Rob Maadi on the Faith on the Field Show; “You go through life and you have different experiences and you just understand that nobody but God could have put you in that situation, So, you just know that and know that, no matter what you do, no matter how good you are, you’re not at this level without Him, so you’ve got to always stay humble and stay grounded and understand to give Him all the glory.”

A man who was one of eleven siblings, one of his favorite Bible Verses also has a one and an eleven; Hebrews 11:1 – Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.

Flowers explains; “So, you know, that’s just the definition of faith which is you know the thing you’ve got to have just in life generally, and definitely out here on the football field; You gotta understand that a lot of things probably don’t look to good or your situation might not look to good but you’ve got to continue to keep the faith and continue to work hard, so that’s a big Scripture in my life.”

Brandin “the Archer” Cooks

Brandin Cooks

Brandin Cooks back in his New Orleans Saints days.   Photo by Keith Allison

The Archer.

It sounds the latest movie the ever-expanding universe of Super Hero movies.

But to football fans, the archer is someone else; Rams Wide Receiver Brandin Cooks.

Cooks was drafted in the 1st Round of the 2014 NFL Draft by the New Orleans Saints.  He played in 10 games his rookie season, starting in 7 of them, racking up 550 receiving yards and 3 touchdowns.  He’s been a staple in the league ever since, starring for the Saints, the New England Patriots, and now the Los Angeles Rams.

Cooks is a man of faith, known around the league for his character.  He’s never been in the spotlight for any controversial reasons.

That all changed in 2016.

After scoring touchdowns, Cooks has a go-to celebration.  With his left-arm push straight-forward, He pulls his right arm back, as if shooting a bow from an arrow.

During the 2016 season, Redskins Defensive Back Josh Norman celebrated in a similar fashion.  He was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct and fined $10,000 for performing what the league deemed to be, a symbol of violence.  The NFL then banned players from ‘shooting a bow from an arrow’ in future celebrations.

The ban wouldn’t stop him.

Cooks explained to NOLA.com; “Well, there are different forms of doing it. You just can’t shoot [the arrow].  I’m still going to pull it out. Whatever happens after that happens. I don’t want to do anything to jeopardize my team, but I’ll figure something out.”

For Cooks, the bow and arrow symbolism are not a symbol of violence.  If not a symbol of violence, then, what it is a symbol of?

One of Brandin Cooks favorite Bible passages is found in Genesis 15-21.  God had promised Abraham that he and his wife Sarah would have a baby boy – even though they were both quite old at this point.  Beginning to doubt God’s promise, Abraham and Sarah agreed that he should have a child by Sarah’s servant, a woman named Hagar.  After agreeing, Hagar soon gave birth to a son, whom they named Ishmael.  In time, God fulfilled His promise, and Sarah gave birth to a son named Isaac.  As you can imagine, there was great tension between Sarah and Hagar – as well as rivalry between Ishmael and Isaac.  After one specific blowup, Sarah asked Abraham to cast Hagar and Ishmael out of their house and out of the community.  Abraham obliged.  When all hope seemed lost for Hagar and her son, God appeared to her, promising that He would protect and provide for them both.  He also promised that, out of Ishmael, a great nation would arise.  Ishmael cared for his mother and became a great archer in the process.

That story stuck with Cooks.  So did another verse; Psalm 144:6; Send forth lightning and scatter your enemy, and shoot your arrows and rout them.

Cooks recalls. “I just remember it sticking with me for such a long time, I remember thinking, maybe I can do something with this.”  The symbolism matters so much to Cooks that he calls himself “The Archer” and had a gold pendant custom-made in the offseason to wear on a gold chain around his neck.  For Cooks, the bow and arrow is equivalent to pointing to the heavens or dropping to a knee after he crosses the goal line.

“It’s one of those things that keeps me honed in and keeps me humble through the success and the gifts that I’ve been given,” Cooks said. “I think it’s a pretty cool way to give God the glory in a different way, and for other people to see it and buy in.”

The next time you see Cooks score a touchdown or make a great play and you see him draw his arm back as if shooting an arrow, remember God’s promises.  He promises to protect us from our enemies, as he said in Psalm 144 and He promises to watch over us, as He did with Ishmael the archer.

Faith Brockers – the Woman Behind the Lineman

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Los Angeles Rams Defensive Tackle Michael Brockers.  Photo by Keith Allison

Though there are many variations of the phrase, you have often heard it said; “Behind every successful man is a strong woman.”  Whether it was a mother, a wife, or another caring, supportive woman, this phrase rings true to many.  Los Angeles Rams defensive lineman, Michael Brokers, is no exception.

Brockers is a 7-year NFL veteran, having spent each of them with the Rams (initially in St. Louis).  He’s a team leader on the defense and man whom many of the younger players look up to.  Rookie John Franklin Myers shared his thoughts regarding Brockers to Gary Klein of the Los Angeles Times; “Usually, after meetings, he has two pages of notes of what he needs to do better for that day.  That’s a guy you look up to – how can you be like him.”  Fellow rookie, Sebastian Joseph-Day added; “Every time I ask him for some advice, he’s always been open and always getting extra work with me.  They’ve got me playing multiple positions, and he’s helped me develop.”

Coach Sean McVey calls Brockers “one of the more underrated players” in the NFL, noting not only his strength but also his presence.  He says of Brockers; “Anybody that knows Michael knows he’s got a great personality where you can’t help but kind of be in a good mood when you’re around him.  He’s got that contagious enthusiasm in a positive way that rubs off on his teammates. … He knows the influence that he has.”

When asked about his dedication to helping young players succeed, Brockers responded with the humility that he demonstrates on so many occasions; “Just trying to help those guys get up to speed, because that’s what I feel it should be about – giving back and helping somebody else grow their game.”

Brockers is an exciting player, a leader in the locker room; a man of devoted faith and excellent character.  In so many ways, Michael Brockers is a successful man.

Behind him is a strong woman; his wife, Faith.

Faith is a devoted mother of two, a blogger, the host of a podcast on woman’s issues, and a dedicated woman of faith.  Her father was a Baptist minister, who taught her – and her brothers Isaiah and Jeremiah, about the Lord.  Her father, however, died when she was 13, leaving her struggling with her faith.  It wasn’t until her first year of marriage that she began to take her walk with the Lord seriously again.

Even after recommitting herself to the Lord, however, she still had her struggles.  She writes;

“I always knew I wanted to start a family, however upon attempting to do so my dreams were soon crushed. The day after my wedding, I soon started to prepare to be a mother. However, a year and a half in, my husband and I were shocked with the news that one fallopian tube was blocked and the other being partially blocked (meaning it would be extremely difficult to have children). Though I was devastated by the news we still needed answers so we sought out a fertility doctor whom recommended IVF. During this emotionally and physically draining process I prayed to God to bless my womb and pondered on the scripture about Sarah in 1 Samuel 1:27, also I was reading Psalms 113:9 daily. It gave me such peace and trust in my Lord that all my prayers would be answered. Sure enough, three months later we conceived our daughter through in vitro fertilization. My husband and I were so thankful to God for trusting us with this precious gift, August 2015 we welcomed our baby girl. Just seven months after the birth of our daughter we found out we had naturally conceived our second child. I have to admit at first I was extremely nervous because it was an unplanned pregnancy. I now realize that nothing is unplanned with God, & now I take pride in carrying my baby boy. When man said it was unlikely, God said other wise. Oh the blessings my God has given to me — I am so very thankful and am joyful that He is a merciful God who loves me so much.”

Faith calls Psalm 139:14 her favorite Bible verse; I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made; wonderful are your works, and my soul knows it very well.  She explains;

This scripture resonates deep, because though it took me my whole childhood I now know that I am made in His likeness and that I am fearfully and wonderfully made. I am a black woman of a darker skin tone and my whole childhood I was mocked and teased for it to where I too believed I was not beautiful because I was “too dark.” Today I revert back to this scripture often when I need reassurance, peace or to thank God for bringing me so far in life through my many storms. His works are indeed wonderful and marvelous. I thank Him for not only healing all my emotional scars but also sending me a Godly man who loves me with all of my flaws. Additionally he lives by the Bible as a priest over our household and loves his family just as Christ loved the church. My God is truly an amazing God!” 

As we watch the Los Angeles Rams take on the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LIII, we see a great deal of successful men on the field.  We give thanks to God for the many faithful women who helped them get there!

 

Jackie Slater – Los Angeles Legend

Super Bowl Series: Many of you will undoubtedly attend Super Bowl parties this year, watching the big game with friends and family members.  As February 3rd approaches, A Lamp unto My Cleats will feature players from the Los Angeles Rams and New England Patriots each day.  My hope is that you will read these stories and prepare to share them with others as you watch the game together.  Use this unique opportunity to share the story of the faith and the good news of Jesus Christ as you watch the game together.

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Each year, as the calendar turns from January to February, Football fans all across America anticipate the Super Bowl.  Fans across the country pick a side – a team to root for – and hope to cheer that team on toward victory.  As we prepare for Super Bowl LIII, fans choose between the New England Patriots and the Los Angeles Rams.

I wonder who Jackie Slater will root for.

On one hand, Slater is a Los Angeles Rams legend.

On the other hand, Jackie’s son, Matthew Slater, plays for the New England Patriots.  (More on him next week).

Jackie Ray Slater was born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi. He attended Jim Hill and Wingfield High Schools where he competed in football, track, and basketball. Jackie was the first in his family to attend a desegregated High School.  He recalls; “It was a different time in the South. A lot of young people back there now take it for granted that they’ll go to school here, or go to school there, do this or do that. It makes me feel real good to see the positive change that has taken place.”

Slater received a scholarship to play football at nearby Jackson State.  At that time, Jackson State’s running back was none other than Walter Payton! In a Paul Zimmerman article entitled Last Stand, featured in the July 10, 1995 edition of Sports Illustrated, Payton told the story;

“I was coming off my freshman year at Jackson State.  All they were talking about was this big tackle here in town, in Jackson, at Wingfield High–6’4-1/2″, 285 pounds, agile, great basketball player. They sent me to his house to pay a visit. He only lived five minutes away from the college.  Of course a lot of my interest was selfish. Nothing better than recruiting another good offensive lineman. He was not at all cocky, always seeking information, kind of amazed at everything that happened. And dedicated. You could tell that right away.”

After a successful collegiate career, Slater was selected in the 3rd Round of the 1976 draft by the Los Angeles Rams.  Slater says that, as a rookie, his overall objective was to “to become the best offensive tackle in the history of the game.” But his more immediate goal, he confessed, “was just to make the team.”

He achieved far more, however, than simply making the team.  He went on to play 20 seasons with the Rams, which, at the time of his retirement was NFL record for the most seasons with one team.  He also played 259 regular-season games for the Rams which was also the most ever by an offensive lineman. He blocked for 24 different quarterbacks and 37 different running backs – 7 of which rushed achieved 1,000 yards seasons behind him (Lawrence McCutcheon, Wendell Tyler, Eric Dickerson, Charles White, Greg Bell, Cleveland Gary, and Jerome Bettis).   He was elected to the Pro Bowl on 7 occasions and named the Lineman of the Year by USA today three times.  He played in 18 Playoff games, 5 NFC Championship games, and 1 Super Bowl – Super Bowl XIV in 1980 against the Pittsburgh Steelers.  His success made him an easy choice as a 1st ballot Hall of Famer.  Walter Payton summed up his evaluation of Jackie Slater by saying, “Of all the people I played with or against, he’d be one of the first three I’d pick if I were starting a team.”

Jackie Slater enjoyed a long and successful career.  Playing until he was 41 years old made him the butt of many jokes.  Quarterback Jim Everett once said; “Jackie Slater is proof that they were playing football in the prehistoric days.  I’ve seen the calluses on his feet where he used to have to stop his car like Fred Flintstone.”

Playing for 20 years also put him in a leadership position in which many young players looked up to him.  Slater says; “I’ve been blessed with a mind and an attitude that I feel you just have to have to compete with guys who are ten years or twelve years your junior. I’ve also been blessed with an excellent support group in my family, and good coaching, and good guys on either side of me.”  Throughout his career, he was admired for being deeply religious, humble, and a hard-worker.

That doesn’t mean, however, that Slater didn’t sometimes struggle.  As a man who played with great passion, one of his greatest challenges was his temper.  In the Book “Men of Integrity,: A Daily Guide to the Bible and Prayer,” Slater provides a devotion based on Proverbs 14:29: A patient man has great understanding, but a quick-tempered man displays folly.  He explains;

“Even though I had become a Christian while in college, I still had a terrible temper.  I was ready to fight anytime, anywhere.  Until the Lord let me seem myself as others saw me.  I was out on the practice field going through one-on-one drive-block drills with the rest of the Los Angeles Rams, when I noticed a problem developing between two players.  A young guard was blasting a long-time veteran so hard he was driving him right off the board.  After this happened several times, the veteran got mad and started throwing punches.  Before the young hard could fight back, however, it was broken up.  I watched the young guard storm off the field and stand along the sidelines, seething with rage.  ‘That’s you, Jackie,’ the Lord seemed to say to me.  ‘That’s just the way you look when you lose your temper.’  I knew it was true.  I decided I didn’t like what I was seeing.  Right then and there, I resolved to seek the Lord’s help each and every time I felt myself beginning to lose control to my anger.  As long as I have remembered to do that, He has never let me down.”

Many of us struggle with our tempers.  While our list of accomplishments isn’t as impressive as Slater’s, we often think highly of ourselves and become frustrated when people don’t see things our way, do things our way, or simply aren’t as impressed us as we think they ought to be.  We should all commit the words of James 1:19 to our hearts and minds; “Know this, my beloved brothers: let every person be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to anger.”

Nick Goody – Luke 1:37

 

Nick Goody

Cleveland Indian’s reliever Nick Goody.  Photo by Erik Drost

 

Like many people, Goody grew up in a Christian home, but God was far from some the center of his family’s life.  He explained in an interview with Athletes in Christ; “Church was not something we did often, but we all believed in god and in works He did… baseball consumed my life and I was fine with it then because I did not know better.”

Only it wasn’t long before baseball became challenging.  “High School freshmen year, tryouts were a disaster, and I was almost cut from the team.”  Thankfully, the coach’s dad saw something in him, and encouraged the coach to keep him around.  Goody had a good high school career, though not quite good enough.  He watched as his friends received Division 1 scholarships to schools like UCF, Miami, and Virginia.  They weren’t interested in him.  So, Goody enrolled in South College of Florida, where his life would soon change forever.

Goody earned a job as the starting shortstop as a freshmen.  He got off to a hot start, but soon things fell apart.  He found himself in a long hitting slump, and was benched for, what he called, “a week break.”  That week turned into two.  Two weeks turned into three.  His coaches gave up on his bat, and tried to get him to turn into a pitcher.  He hated pitching.  He wasn’t happy with his school.  He didn’t have faith in his coaches.  He was ready to give up and go home.

But one night, his coach, Barry Batson, invited him to a Bible study in his home.  Goody went – perhaps more for the free meal than anything else.  While he was there, Goody prayed to God, asked for forgiveness, and asked God to direct his life.  He recalls; “I felt this huge weight being lifted off my shoulders.  I could see changes in my life happening, relationships with people were better, and I felt like I was a part of something bigger.  I was not caught up in a terrible baseball season, my attitude changed and so did my game.  I went from being the starting S to a bull pen guy and found some success, baseball was fun again.  Life was good.”

After receiving Christ, Goody’s life changed quickly.  By the end of his freshmen year, he received a scholarship to play at LSU and was also drafted in the 22nd round of the 2011 draft.  He had always hated the Yankees.  He prayed about it and finally chose to attend LSU.  He faced struggles as he adjusted to the talent in the SEC, but credits his faith as helping him get through it.  When the Major League Draft rolled around in 2012, Goody heard his named called again.  This time in the 6th round.  By the Yankees, again.  This time, Goody signed and attended major league camp.

One day, after camp, Goody’s life took another challenging turn.  Goody drove to Orlando to spend his girlfriend’s birthday with her.  On the way to dinner, he was part of a 4 car accident.  His truck was totaled and he tore 3 ligaments in his ankle.  The whole time he recalls staying calm, trusting that God was in control.  He recovered from the ankle injuries, but then his elbow started acting up.  He found that he had a partially torn UCL, and would have to chose between rehab and Tommy John surgery, which has about a year to a year and a half recovery time.  Goody committed it to prayer, while driving home one day, and asked God for a sign.  As Goody recalls; “I needed His help and, I kid you not, the next car that drove by me license plate had a big ole TJ written on it.  I called my trainer the next day and told him I was getting the surgery.”

The surgery was a success.  Goody recovered and, by the 2015 season, he made his major league debut with the Yankees.  In December of 2016, Goody was traded to Cleveland Indians.

Nick’s favorite Bible passage is Luke 1:37, which reads, For nothing is impossible with God.”  “I never really knew what that meant or truly believed it until I had to… I’m living proof that God can change your life.  I’ve seen Him work in my life and in others.  The signs God has given me and the prayers that have been answered cannot be explained.  Other than that the big man upstairs is watching over us.  I am not saying I’m perfect or have never messed up because I do daily.  But God has blessed me… and I find comfort knowing… there is a plan for all of us and it is exciting to know it’s exactly what God wants.”