Cody Parkey – a Champion in Defeat

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The name Cody Parkey is now a part of NFL history.

A week ago, Cody Parkey was anything but a household name.  Growing up fan of the Philadelphia Eagles, I remember him beginning his career in the Metallic Green and Black, and I fondly remember his Pro Bowl Season back in 2014.  After that season, though, Parkey faded into obscurity.  Prior to the 3rd game of the 2015 season, Parkey tore all 3 muscles in his groin, causing him to miss the entire season.  He was released the following fall.  From there, Parkey bounced around the league, going first to the Cleveland Browns, followed by headed to Miami to play for the Dolphins.  He finally found a new home prior to the 2018 season with the Chicago Bears, signing a 4-year contract.

The season didn’t go the way Parkey had planned.  The low point of the regular season came on November 11th in a game against the Detroit Lions.  Parkey famously – and know somehow fortuitously – hit the uprights on 4 separate kick attempts – two field goals and two extra points; none of them going through.  Following that game, however, Parkey seemed to return to form.  He connected on 10 of his 12 field goal attempts to close out the regular season.  He also opened the Post Season on January 6th against his former team, the Philadelphia Eagles, by connecting on his first 3 field goal tries.

But then, in an instant, everything changed.  In the final seconds of the game, Parkey had the opportunity to win the game.  He lined up for a 43-yard field goal.  If he was successful, the Bears would win 18-16 and advance to the next round of the playoffs.  The snap was good.  The kick felt good.  Eagles defender Treyvon Hester got a finger on the ball, but it was so slight that no one seemed to notice.  The ball drifted to the left, hit the goal post, fluttered down to the cross bar, and bounced out.  The Bears lost.  Their season ended.  Parkey hung his head in shame while being consoled by teammates.

And then in happened.

Parkey lifted his eyes to sky, and pointed upward, giving glory to God.

Parkey had failed.  His team had lost.  He will go down in infamy in the annuls of Chicago Sports History.  He will be the most hated man in the city, joining the ranks of Steve Bartman.  His future, both with the Bear and in the NFL is, at least for now, in question.  But Parkey still gave glory to God.

After most of the cameras had left the downcast Bears sideline and the jubilant Eagles as they stormed the field, they found Parkey again.  He was kneeling in between Bears punter Pat O’Donnell, Eagles offensive lineman Stefan Wisniewski, with a group of players from both teams in prayer.

His response was everything it should have been; beautiful, inspiring, puzzling.

For some, Parkey served as an inspiration.  He reminds us of what it means to keep all things in their proper perspective, to give glory to God in all circumstances, to support fellow Christians – even if they play for the other team.  Dan Andros wrote an article the following morning entitled; “Why I’m Telling My Sons to Be Like Bears Kicker Cody Parkey.

To others, Parkey’s faith made no sense.  Barstool Sports went to Social Media to mock Parkey, writing “Look, I know some people put a whole lot into their faith and it’s their whole live and blah blah blah, but you gotta tell God he’s at least sleeping on the couch tonight.  I’m not saying forget everything and rebuke him and all that, but let him know you’re upset.”  The post continued with more foul language and disregard for the 2nd Commandment.

Our basic human response when things don’t go our way to is to get angry at God; to blame Him; to want nothing to do with Him.  But Parkey took a moment of weakness and showed the strength of his character and his faith.  He reminded us that God is good, even when life doesn’t go our way.

On Parkey’s Instagram page, he has one Christian Devotion posted.  The devotion asks “What mountain is in front of you this morning?  It suggests that perhaps one’s mountain is a sickness, a troubled relationship, or a floundering business (it never suggests a missed field goal).  As we consider our obstacles, a verse in mentioned – Joel 3:10, which reads beat your plowshares into swords, and your pruning hooks into spears; let the weak say, “I am a warrior.” 

In his moment of weakness, Parkey acted like a warrior.  He kept his head up and found a way to give glory and honor to God at a moment when many of us would have felt like hiding in the shadows.  He may not have won the game, but Parkey reminded us what a champion truly looks like.